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adaeratio  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Adaeratio, the procedure whereby dues to the Roman state in kind were commuted to cash payments. The related word adaerare first appears in ce 383 (Cod. Theod. 7. 18. 8) and the practice is ... More

aerarii  

Andrew Dominic Edwards Lewis

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aerarii, payers, were a class of Roman citizens who had incurred the *censors' condemnation for some moral or other misbehaviour. They were required to pay the poll-tax (*tributum) at a ... More

aerarium  

Graham Burton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aerarium, derived from aes, denotes ‘treasury’. The main aerarium of Rome was the aerarium Saturni, so called from the temple below the Capitol, in which it was placed. Here were kept state ... More

aes  

Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Aes, bronze, also more loosely copper or brass, hence (a) money, coinage, pay, period for which pay is due, campaign; (b) document on bronze. The earliest Roman monetary ... More

alimenta  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The purpose of the alimentary foundations in the Roman empire was to give an allowance for feeding children, and this was achieved by the investment of capital in mortgage on land, the ... More

amber  

D. W. R. Ridgway

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Amber, a fossil resin, has a wide natural distribution in northern Europe and is also found in Sicily: so far as is known, the amber from the classical Mediterranean was Baltic. It has been found at ... More

annona (grain)  

Paul Erdkamp

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Imperial Rome was by far the largest city of its time, and feeding its populace—about one million according to most estimates—required an ever-watchful eye on the part of the authorities. ... More

apodektai  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Apodektai (‘receivers’), at Athens, a board of officials who received the state's revenues and, in the 5th cent. bce, paid them into the central state treasury, in the 4th, apportioned them ... More

arbitration, Greek  

Marcus Niebuhr Tod and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The submission of disputes to a neutral person or body, whose verdict the disputants agreed in advance to accept, was recognized among Greeks from earliest times. Many states (e.g. Sparta, Gortyn, ... More

arbitration, Roman  

A. N. Sherwin-White and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
For private arbitration see D. Roebuck and B. de Loynes de Fumichon, Roman Arbitration (2004). The history of Roman inter-state arbitration begins with the intervention of Rome as a great power in ... More

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