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Donatus and Donatism  

David E. Wilhite

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Subject:
Christianity
The Donatist party began around 312 ce when Mensurius, bishop of Carthage, died and was replaced by Caecilian. Caecilian’s accusers claimed that he had been ordained by a traditor, someone ... More

Proclus Constantinopolitanus, c. 385–446 CE; bishop, 434–446 CE  

Maximos Constas

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
An early archbishop of Constantinople and a popular preacher in the rhetorical style of Gregory Nazianzus (d. 390), Proclus was the principal architect of the Byzantine cult of the Virgin Mary. ... More

Constantia, half-sister of Constantine and wife of Licinius  

Julia Hillner

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
Late antique sources remember Flavia Iulia Constantia,1 conventionally for her loyalty to her imperial relatives, both by birth and by marriage, and, more innovatively, for her Christian patronage, a ... More

Benedictus Nursinus, c. 480–c. 550 CE  

Scott G. Bruce

Online publication date:
May 2016
Benedict of Nursia was an Italian abbot active in the hinterland of Rome at Subiaco and Monte Cassino in the early 6th century. He is best known as the author of a normative guide for monastic life, ... More

Antonius Abba, 251?–356 CE  

Samuel Rubenson

Online publication date:
May 2016
Subject:
Christianity
Among the first generations of the Egyptian monastic movement of the 4th century ce, Antonius, generally referred to as Saint Antony, stands out as the most important and best documented figure. The ... More

Vulgate  

J. H. D. Scourfield

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Latin version of the Bible. The first Latin translations of Scripture (Vetus Latina, Old Latin) began to appear in the 2nd cent. ce. By the late 4th cent., the situation was chaotic: some ... More

Victorinus, Marius, 4th cent. CE  

James Frederick Mountford and Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Christianity
Marius Victorinus was the author of philosophical (Neoplatonic), rhetorical, and grammatical works. His reputation was such that a statue in his honour was set up in the *forum Traiani. After ... More

Vatican  

Bryan Ward-Perkins

Vatican, an extramural area of the city of Rome, on the right bank of the *Tiber around the mons Vaticanus. In the early empire the Vatican was the site of an imperial park (the horti ... More

Thomas Magister, of Thessalonica  

John Francis Lockwood and Robert Browning

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Christianity
Thomas Magister was the secretary of the Byzantine emperor Andronicus II (1282–1328 ce), but withdrew to a monastery, where he devoted himself to scholarship. ... More

Thessalonica  

Nicholas Geoffrey Lemprière Hammond

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Thessalonica, a city of *Macedonia, founded by *Cassander, who synoecized the small towns at the head of the Thermaic Gulf (see synoecism); perhaps on the site of Therme (Strabo 7 fr. 24). It was ... More

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