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Tyndareos  

Jenny March

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tyndareos (Τυνδάρεως or -ος), in mythology husband of *Leda and father, real or putative, of *Helen, *Clytemnestra, the *Dioscuri, Timandra, and Philonoe. His brothers were said to be Leucippus, ... More

Typhōn  

Ken Dowden

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Typhōn (Typhaōn Typhōeus), monster and adversary of *Zeus. *Hesiod's Typhoeus (Theog.823–35) has 100 snake-heads, eyes blazing fire, and voices that cover the gamut of gods and animals. The final ... More

Tyro  

Richard Hunter

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tyro, in mythology, daughter of *Salmoneus and mother (by Cretheus) of *Jason(1)'s father Aeson and (by *Poseidon) of the twins *Pelias and *Neleus. Tyro loved the river *Enipeus, but Poseidon ... More

Tyrrhenus  

Herbert Jennings Rose

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Tyrrhenus (Τυρρηνός), eponym of the Tyrrhenians (i.e. *Etruscans, though see West on Hes. Theog. 1016), Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 1. 27. 1, where he is son of King Atys and comes from Maeonia (Lydia); in ... More

Uranus  

Emily Kearns

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Uranus (Greek Ouranos), the divine personification of the sky in Greece. Scarcely known in cult, his best-known appearance is in *Hesiod'sTheogony (126 ff.). He is produced by *Gaia (Earth), then ... More

votive offerings  

Irad Malkin

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Votive offerings are voluntary dedications to the gods, resulting not from prescribed ritual or sacred calendars but from ad hoc vows of individuals or communities in circumstances usually of ... More

wind  

Liba Taub

Online publication date:
Feb 2017
In classical times, wind was in some cases understood to be a god, or as being under the influence of a god; it was understood by some to be a phenomenon liable to prediction and/or explanation as a ... More

wind-gods  

Alan H. Griffiths

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Wind-gods are attested as the object of anxious cultic attention as early as the Mycenaean period, when a priestess of the winds (anemōn iereia) is recorded on the *Cnossus tablets (see mycenaean ... More

women in cult  

Emily Kearns

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Women played a prominent part in the public religious life of the Greek cities, their roles being in many respects different from those of men. Most, though not all, cults of a female deity were ... More

worship, household  

J. D. Mikalson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
The domestic cult of a Greek family concerned the protection and prosperity of the house and its occupants, with daily small offerings and prayers to *Zeus Ctesius (protector of the ... More

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