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Caprotina  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Caprotina, title of *Juno, from Nonae Caprotinae (‘Nones of the Wild *Fig’) on 7 July, to whom freedwomen and female slaves sacrificed, then fighting a mock battle with fig-tree sticks (Varro, Ling. ... More

Capys  

Stephen J. Harrison

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Capys, (1) father of *Anchises (Il. 20. 239); (2) companion of Aeneas and founder of *Capua (Aen. 10. 145); (3) king of *Alba Longa (Livy 1. 3. 8).

Caristia  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Caristia (cara cognatio), Roman family festival on 22 February. Ovid (Fast. 2. 617–38) makes it a reunion of surviving family members after the *Parentalia's rites to the departed (February 13–21), ... More

Carmen arvale  

John Scheid

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Hymn sung during the sacrifice to *Dea Dia by the *fratres arvales (arval brethren). Although only recorded in an inscriptional copy of ce 218 (A. Gordon, Album of Dated Latin Inscriptions ... More

Carmentis  

C. Robert Phillips

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Carmentis or Carmenta (the latter Greek and seldom Latin, as Hyg. Fab. 277. 2), meaning ‘full of *carmen (divine incantation)’; see A. Ernout and A. Meillet, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue ... More

carmina triumphalia  

John Wight Duff and Simon Price

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Carmina triumphalia, songs sung, in accordance with ancient custom, by soldiers at a *triumph, either in praise of their victorious general or in a satiric ribaldry supposed ... More

Castor and Pollux  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Castor and Pollux, the temple of the *Dioscuri (aedes Castorum or even Castoris) at Rome, in the Forum, beside the Fountain of Juturna, was attributed (see especially Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 6. 13. 1–2) ... More

Ceres  

Herbert Jennings Rose and John Scheid

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
An ancient Italo-Roman goddess of growth (her name derives from † ker- ‘growth’), commonly identified in antiquity with *Demeter. Her name (*OscanKerri-, see the ‘Curse of Vibia’, Conway, Ital. Dial. ... More

Chaldaean Oracles  

David Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
These are conventionally attributed either to a certain Julian the Chaldaean, who is alleged to have flourished in the reign of *Trajan, or to his son, Julian the Theurgist, who lived in the reign of ... More

Claros  

David Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
*Oracle and grove of *Apollo belonging to the city of Colophon. The oracle appears to have been founded by the 8th cent. bce, as stories about its foundation appear in the Epigoni (attributing the ... More

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