You are looking at  51-60 of 254 articles  for:

  • Science and Technology x
Clear All

View:

botany  

John Scarborough

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
From earliest times, Greeks and Romans had expert familiarity with plants and their growth cycles; agriculture dominates, alongside acute command of medicinal herbs, including production of oils and ... More

bronze  

Frederick Norman Pryce and Michael Vickers

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The ancients used the words χαλκός, *aes, indiscriminately for copper and for the harder and more fusible bronze, an alloy of copper and tin. Implements of bronze are found in Egypt and *Mesopotamia ... More

Bryson  

Wilbur R. Knorr

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Bryson (early 4th cent. bce), of Heraclea (3) Pontica, a sophist associated with the following of *Euclides (1) of Megara, he is criticized by Aristotle for an allegedly fallacious quadrature of the ... More

Callimachus (4), of Bithynia (?), Alexandrian physician, later 3rd cent. BCE?  

Heinrich von Staden

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Alexandrian physician (later 3rd cent. BCE?), member of the ‘school’ of *Herophilus. He ascribed great value to semiotics, i.e. to the careful study of symptomatic signs (τὰ σημεῖα τὰ ... More

Callippus, astronomer, fl. 330 BCE  

G. J. Toomer

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Callippus (RE 22), astronomer (fl. 330 BCE), went with Polemarchus (pupil of *Eudoxus (1)) from *Cyzicus to Athens, where he associated with Aristotle. He corrected Eudoxus’ theory of ... More

canals  

Ernst Badian and T. W. Potter

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Canals (fossae, διώρυγες). Drainage and *irrigation canals were widely used in antiquity. The oldest, in Iraq, date to the sixth millennium bce, while in *Egypt they were in use from the fourth ... More

Carmen de ponderibus et mensuris  

Wilbur R. Knorr and Serafina Cuomo

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Carmen de ponderibus et mensuris (perhaps c.400 ce), a Latin didactic poem in 208 hexameter verses, once ascribed to *Priscian, but now attributed to one Rem(m)ius Favinus (or Flav[in]us), ... More

Cassius Dionysius  

William David Ross

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Cassius Dionysius of *Utica, wrote (1) (88 bce) a Greek translation (with additions) of the work of the Carthaginian Mago on agriculture, which became the standard work on the subject, used by all ... More

Cassius (1), Roman physician  

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

A Roman physician of the time of Augustus and Tiberius (31 bce–37 ce). His specific for the relief of colic was famous in antiquity.

Cassius (2), doctor-sophist  

William David Ross and V. Nutton

Online publication date:
Dec 2015

Doctor-sophist, the author of Ἰατρικαὶ ἀπορίαι καὶ προβλήματα φυσικά (‘medical puzzles and problems of physics’), not earlier than the 3rd cent. ce.

View: