You are looking at  51-60 of 242 articles  for:

  • Greek Material Culture: Classical and Hellenistic x
Clear All

View:

Calauria  

D. Graham J. Shipley

Calauria (now Póros), a Saronic island (23 sq. km.: 9 sq. mi.) adjacent to the Argolid, and its polis. The town lay near the island's summit (283 m.: 928 ft.); its remains, chiefly Hellenistic, ... More

Callicrates (1), Athenian architect, 5th cent. BCE  

Richard Allan Tomlinson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Athenian *architect of the 5th cent. bce, responsible for work at the Nike sanctuary and the central long wall to the Piraeus (see athens, topography). He was associated with *Ictinus (see ... More

Callimachus (2), Greek sculptor, fl. c. 430–400 BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
He made a golden lamp for the *Erechtheum, a set of bronze Laconian dancers, and a *Hera for *Plataea, and allegedly invented the Corinthian capital (Vitr. 4. 1. 9–10). He may also have invented the ... More

Callipolis  

W. M. Murray

Callipolis (also Callion), main city of the Aetolian tribe Callieis (a branch of the Ophiones), located in eastern *Aetolia on the upper Mournos river. Mentioned by *Thucydides (2) (3. 96. ... More

Camarina  

Arthur Geoffrey Woodhead and R. J. A. Wilson

A Syracusan (see syracuse) colony founded c.599 bce at the mouth of the river Hipparis in southern Sicily, near modern Scoglitti. Its mid-6th cent. fortifications enclose a vast area of 145 ha. (358 ... More

caryatides  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A Greek term for column-shafts carved in the form of draped women; male equivalents were called Atlantides (see atlas). Apparently named after Caryae in *Laconia, where virgins danced to *Artemis ... More

Cassope  

W. M. Murray

Cassope, main city of the Cassopaeans, a Thesprotian people (see thesproti) who broke away around 400 bce to become an independent tribal state. An Epidaurian inscription (see epidaurus) ... More

cemeteries  

Ian Morris

The organization of a formal cemetery, as a space reserved exclusively for the disposal of the *dead, was an important dimension of the social definition of the ancient city. Burial within the ... More

Cephisodotus (1), Athenian sculptor, fl. c. 372–369 BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Cephisodotus (1), Athenian sculptor, probably father of *Praxiteles and a brother-in-law of *Phocion. *Pliny (2)'s floruit of 372–369 bce (HN 34. 50) may relate to his most famous work, the bronze ... More

Cephisodotus (2), Athenian sculptor, fl. 344–293 BCE  

Andrew F. Stewart

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Cephisodotus (2), Athenian sculptor, son of *Praxiteles. Active between 344 and 293 bce. With his younger brother Timarchus, Cephisodotus inherited his father's workshop, his clientele, ... More

View: