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Sigeum  

Simon Hornblower

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Sigeum, important site in the *Troas (NW *Asia Minor), acquired by Athens—the first overseas Athenian possession—in the late 7th cent. bce, after arbitration by *Periander between Athens and ... More

stele  

John Boardman and Alan Johnston

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Stele, stone slab, in particular one bearing figured decoration or an inscribed text. Grave markers are found occasionally in bronze age Greece, the most notable being those with relief ... More

Tegea  

James Roy

Tegea, a *polis of SE *Arcadia situated in a high upland basin crossed by important routes to *Argos(1), Sparta, and SW and E. Arcadia. The polis was formed from nine local communities, but when an ... More

Thera  

R. W. V. Catling

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Thera (mod. Santorini, 76 km.2), the southernmost of the *Cyclades. It and Therasia are the remnants of a volcanic island destroyed in a cataclysmic eruption c.1650–1500 bce, burying the prehistoric ... More

Tiryns  

Joseph Maran

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
The strongly fortified acropolis of Mycenaean Tiryns is situated about 1.5 kilometres from the present coast of the Bay of Nauplion (but only about five hundred metres in the Early Bronze Age and one ... More

weighing instruments  

Frederick Norman Pryce, Mabel L. Lang, and David William John Gill

The balance (σταθμός, libra, bilanx) of two pans at equal distance from the point of suspension is an invention of the earliest times; in Mycenaean tablets (see mycenaean language) it is the symbol ... More

weights  

Frederick Norman Pryce, Mabel L. Lang, and David William John Gill

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Weights of the Greek bronze age are usually flattened cylinders of stone or metal, incised circles on the upper surface indicating the unit of measurement. Other forms are the duck and the ... More

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