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Demosthenes (2), Athenian orator, 384–322 BCE  

George Law Cawkwell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
The greatest Athenian orator. When Demosthenes was 7 years old his father died, leaving the management of his estate to his brothers, Aphobus and Demophon, and a friend, Therippides. The trustees ... More

Dinarchus, c. 360–c. 290 BCE  

George Law Cawkwell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Dinarchus (Δείναρχος) (c. 360–c. 290 bce), the last of the Ten *Attic Orators (for the formation of the *canon, see Caecilius (1)). For the outline of his life we largely depend on *Dionysius (7) of ... More

Diopeithes, decree of, c. 432 BCE  

Michael Gagarin

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
The decree of Diopeithes, (c. 432 bce) provided an impeachment procedure against impiety. *Plutarch (Per.32), our only source, says it attacked ‘those who fail to respect (nomizein) things divine or ... More

dokimasia  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The term δοκιμασία and the related verb dokimazein were used in various Greek contexts to denote a procedure of examining or testing, and approving or validating as a result of the test.1 For Athens, ... More

domains  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
In the Homeric poems the basileis (lords) have special lots, or temenē (see temenos), like those set aside for *Glaucus (1) and *Sarpedon in *Lycia, the gardens of *Alcinous (1), or the carefully ... More

Draco  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Draco, according to Athenian tradition, was a lawgiver who introduced new laws in the year when Aristaechmus was archon (see archontes), probably 621/0 bce. This was the first time that Athenian laws ... More

eisangelia  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
Eisangelia (εἰσαγγελία), in Athenian law was the name of four distinct types of prosecution.1. The accuser denounced someone to the *ekklēsia or the *boulē for treason. In the 4th cent. bce a law ... More

ekklēsia  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme, Theodore John Cadoux, and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
Ekklēsia (in some states (h)ēliaia or its dialect equivalent, or agora), the assembly of adult male citizens which had the ultimate decision-making power in a Greek state. There was room for ... More

elections and voting, Greek  

P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
In the Greek states voting was used in councils, assemblies, and lawcourts; appointments were made by election or by allotment (see sortition) or sometimes by a combination of the two. In ... More

Eleven  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Greek Law
Eleven (οἱ ἕνδεκα), Athenian officials, appointed by lot, who had charge of the prison and executions. They took into custody persons accused of serious theft or certain other crimes. If the thief ... More

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