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censor  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
The title of one of a pair of senior Roman magistrates, elected by the centuriate assembly (see centuria) to hold office for eighteen months. Although they lacked *imperium and the right to an escort ... More

census  

Peter Sidney Derow

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A national register prepared at Rome, on the basis of which were determined voting rights and liability for military service and taxation. The census was held first by the king, then by the *consuls, ... More

centumviri  

Barry Nicholas

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Centumviri, (lit. 100 men), a special civil court at Rome, or, strictly, the panel from which a court (consilium) was chosen. The panel numbered in fact in the later republic 105 men (three taken ... More

Cervidius Scaevola, Quintus  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Quintus Cervidius Scaevola, a leading Roman lawyer of the later 2nd cent. ce, probably came from *Carthage and, through his wife, had a close connection with Nemausus (Nîmes). Perhaps a pupil of ... More

citizenship, Roman  

Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
In both the Greek and the Roman world in the Archaic period, it seems that communities were open to the arrival of people from elsewhere, at all social levels, whether one thinks of Hesiod's father, ... More

civitas  

Nicholas Purcell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
Civitas, ‘citizenship, citizen community’ (for the first, see citizenship, roman), term of Roman administrative law referring, like Greek *polis, to any free-standing community, and specifically, in ... More

classis  

Tim Cornell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Roman Law
A classis (‘class’) was a group of Roman citizens who could meet a certain minimum wealth qualification. Servius *Tullius is supposed to have divided property owners into five classes for military ... More

cliens  

Arnaldo Momigliano and Tim Cornell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
In Rome a client was a free man who entrusted himself to another and received protection in return. Clientship was a hereditary social status consecrated by usage and recognized, though not defined ... More

client kings  

David C. Braund

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
The term ‘client kings’ is conventionally used by scholars to denote a range of monarchs and quasi-monarchs of non-Roman peoples who enjoyed a relationship with Rome that was essentially harmonious ... More

codex  

Tony Honoré

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Roman Law
Codex, though it came to have a special meaning in legal contexts, denotes leaves of wood, papyrus, or (especially) parchment bound together in the form of a modern volume as opposed to a roll. (See ... More

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