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Damia and Auxesia  

Nicholas J. Richardson

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Goddesses of fertility (cf. demeter and persephone/kore), worshipped at *Epidaurus, *Aegina, and *Troezen (Hdt. 5. 82–8 and IG 4.22 787; Paus. 2. 32. 2). Herodotus says that the cult at Epidaurus was ... More

deformity  

Robert Garland

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Malnutrition, *disease, and certain social practices contributed to the prevalence of congenital deformity in antiquity, though palaeopathology can tell us nothing about the level of incidence of any ... More

demography  

Saskia Hin

People’s life courses are shaped by the complex interactions of contextual factors, of individual behavior, and of opportunities and constraints operating at the macro level. Demography ... More

ephēboi  

Simon Hornblower and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ephēboi originally meant boys who had reached the age of puberty, and was one of several terms for age classes; but in 4th-cent. bce Athens it came to have a special paramilitary sense, boys who in ... More

epithalamium  

Eveline Krummen and Donald Russell

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A song (or speech) given ‘at the bridal chamber (θάλαμος)’ ([Dion. Hal.] Rhet. 4. 1); a regular feature of marriages (see marriage ceremonies). Strictly speaking, it is distinct from the general ... More

eunuchs, religious  

Richard Gordon

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
In the Classical period, religious eunuchs are a feature of several Anatolian cults of female deities, extending across to Scythia (Hdt. 4. 67: not shamans) and to the southern foothills of the ... More

eunuchs, secular  

E. D. Hunt

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
To the classical world eunuchs were despised figures who haunted the courts of oriental monarchs. The Persian king employed them prominently as guardians of his harem and loyal protectors of his ... More

gender  

Mark Golden

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Gender, the social construction of sexual difference, was an important Greek and Roman means of apprehending and explaining their world. It has also been central to modern understandings of Greece ... More

gynaecology  

Helen King

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Gynaecology existed in the ancient world as a medical specialism, but its separate identity was not always permitted by wider medical theories. The significant question was this: do women have ... More

hetairai  

Madeleine M. Henry

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Hetairai (“companions,” sing. hetaira) is an Attic euphemism for those women, slave, freed, or foreign, who were paid for sexual favours (see prostitution, secular). The term first appears with ... More

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