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sylē  

John Davies

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Sylē and its cognate verb (συλᾶν) denoted the act of stripping an outsider or an enemy of his possessions by force, nominally in reprisal for previous hurt or outstanding *debt (cf. Hom.Il. 11. ... More

symbolon  

Robert J. Hopper and Paul C. Millett

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Symbolon, originally a physical object, intended as a material indication of identification or agreement. What may have begun as a private practice as a reminder of xenia or ritualized friendship ... More

symmoria  

Friedrich M. Heichelheim and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Symmoria (‘partnership’), in Athens a group of men liable for payment of the tax called *eisphora or for the *liturgy of the *trierarchy. In 378/7 bce all payers of eisphora were organized in ... More

sympoliteia  

Jakob Aall Ottesen Larsen and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
The verb sympoliteuein is used from the late 5th cent. bce onwards to denote the merging of separate communities in a single state, similar to *synoecism (Thuc. 6. 4. 1, Xen.Hell. 5. 2. 12). In ... More

synoecism  

Victor Ehrenberg and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Synoecism (synoikismos), in the Greek world, the combination of several smaller communities to form a single larger community. Sometimes the union was purely political and did not affect the pattern ... More

syssitia  

Stephen Hodkinson

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
The generic name for mess-companies of citizens in various Greek cities, especially in *Sparta and *Crete. Some scholars view them as successors of the common messes of archaic warrior clubs or ... More

tagos  

Bruno Helly

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Tagos (ταγός), considered the official title of the supreme civil and military magistrate of the Thessalians (see thessaly) since E. Meyer, who tried to establish a list of these alleged leaders in ... More

tetrarchy  

Henry Dickinson Westlake and Antony Spawforth

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Tetrarchy was first used to denote one of the four political divisions of *Thessaly (‘tetrad’ being a purely geographical term). The term found its way to the Hellenistic east and was ... More

thesmothetai  

D. M. MacDowell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Greek Law
Thesmothetai in Athens were the six junior of the nine *archontes, appointed annually. They were instituted in the 7th cent. bce. Thesmos is an early word for ‘law’ or ‘rule’, but it is unlikely that ... More

thētes  

Arnold Wycombe Gomme, Theodore John Cadoux, and P. J. Rhodes

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Thētes, hired labourers, the lowest class of free men in a Greek state. At Athens, after *Solon, the lowest of the four property classes, said (perhaps by false analogy with *pentakosiomedimnoi) to ... More

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