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Ambrose, b. 340 CE  

Philip Rousseau

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Christianity
Ambrose (Ambrosius), son of a praetorian prefect of Gaul, Ambrose was well educated and achieved official success under the patronage of the great prefects Sex. Claudius *Petronius Probus and Q. ... More

asceticism  

Philip Rousseau and M. J. Edwards

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Subject:
Christianity
“Discipline” is the common translation of the Greek noun askêsis. Its English derivative “asceticism” denotes a sustained routine of abstinence, more severe than the occasional self-denial ... More

Bede (Beda Venerabilis), c. 673–735 CE  

Scott DeGregorio

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Bede (Beda Venerabilis) was Anglo-Saxon England’s most prolific Latin writer, and indeed one of the most distinguished authors of the early Middle Ages. At the end of his most celebrated work, ... More

epic, biblical  

Martin J. Brooke

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A late antique genre in which material from the Bible is versified in hexameters. Six major texts survive, the earliest being (1) the Evangeliorum libri IV of *Iuvencus. (2) The Heptateuchos of ... More

Leo (1) I, 'the Great', pope, 440–461 CE  

Samuel James Beeching Barnish

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Christianity
As deacon, though an unoriginal theologian, he influenced Popes Celestine I and Sixtus III on doctrine, and served in secular diplomacy. As pope, he purged Manichaeans (see manichaeism) from Rome, in ... More

Polycarp, c. 69–c. 155 CE  

Henry Chadwick and M. J. Edwards

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Subject:
Christianity
Bishop of *Smyrna and correspondent of Ignatius of Antioch. His martyrdom at the age of 86 is described in a letter from the Smyrnaean church to that at Philomelium, Phrygia. That the MSS preserve an ... More

Tarsus  

Arnold Hugh Martin Jones and Stephen Mitchell

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
Tarsus, a native Cilician (see cilicia) town with a long prehistoric past, which later claimed *Triptolemus, *Perseus(1), and above all *Heracles as its founder. It was capital of the Cilician kings ... More

theurgy  

Anne Sheppard

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Subject:
Christianity
Theurgy was a form of pagan religious *magic associated with the *Chaldaean Oracles and taken up by the later Neoplatonists. It covered a range of magical practices, from rain-making and cures to ... More

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