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Ara Pacis  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Ara Pacis, a monumental altar erected in the northern *Campus Martius near the via Lata (Corso), considered one of the major products of Augustan public art. It was voted in 13 bce by the senate, as ... More

athletics, Roman  

Stephen Instone

Online publication date:
Mar 2016
At Rome colourful *circus spectacles (especially chariot-racing) and *ball games were the most popular sporting activities. But Augustus promoted traditional athletics, staging athletics ... More

baths  

Janet DeLaine

Online publication date:
Jul 2015
Baths, one of the most characteristic and widely distributed types of Roman buildings, had their origins in the Greek world where public baths were common from at least the 4th cent. bce. Surviving ... More

building techniques and materials, Roman  

Roger B. Ulrich

Online publication date:
Nov 2017
The inherent strengths, weaknesses, and availability of diverse Roman building materials governed the techniques used in construction and greatly influenced the final appearance of Roman ... More

centuriation  

Michael Crawford

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
A system of marking out the land in squares or rectangles, by means of limites, boundaries, normally prior to distribution in a colonial foundation. (The units above and below the centuria are ... More

collegium  

Piero Treves, Cyril Bailey, and Andrew Lintott

(1) Magisterial or priestly: a board of officials. (2) Private: any private association of fixed membership and constitution (see clubs, roman).The principle of collegiality was a standard feature of ... More

damnatio memoriae  

John Percy Vyvian Dacre Balsdon and Barbara Levick

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
After the deaths of persons deemed by the senate enemies of the state, measures to erase their memory might follow. Originally there was no set package, as the phrase implies (cf. Ulp.Dig. ... More

dicing  

Ludwig Alfred Moritz

Dicing with six-sided dice (κύβοι, tesserae) or four-sided knucklebones (ἀστράγαλοι, tali; natural or manufactured from e.g. ivory) was a popular amusement in both Greece and Rome, either ... More

family, Roman  

Susan M. Treggiari

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
English ‘family’ has connotations which have changed during its long history and vary according to context. Biologically, an individual human being is related to parents, through them to ... More

fasces  

Andrew Drummond

Online publication date:
Dec 2015
Comprised bundles of rods, approximately 1.5 m. (5 ft.) long and of elm- or birchwood, and a single-headed axe; they were held together by red thongs and carried by *lictores. An iron set from a late ... More

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